Without jokes not mentioned, “Top 2000 Jojo” is a lot less bloated

Arno Heijtema

It doesn’t really matter, because Top 2000 Jojo It stands anyway, with this engaging mix of oral histories, vintage videos, interviews with pop musicians, and fragments of their concerts. Of secondary importance is how the new, but long-recognised, skilled presenter Hermann van der Zandt can handle, for the first time in the footsteps and shadow of the crumbling Matthijs van Nieuwerk. A side issue, but it’s still nice to see if there was indeed a chemistry between van der Zandt and co-anchor music taster Leo Bloches on Monday night.

You must not use his name in vain, the direction must have insinuated the duo, and so van der Zandt gushed about the eponymous with his introduction: “This year is Top 2000 Jojo A little different than usual. See for yourself. I feel a bit like a guest here. In this way expectations do not really increase, and perhaps that is why Comrade Blokhuis felt compelled to inspire the full studio like a master of the ring. He was forced a little bit, so much so that sometimes you got the impression he ate Van der Zandt as an anchor. Well, in terms of division of roles, progress is conceivable.

Leo Blokhuis and Herman van der Zandt present “Top2000 a gogo”.NTR image

Compared to previous releases, where I moved through the studio in the hustle and bustle, interaction with the audience was on the back burner. Less enthusiastic, which is not at all a shame for a program that doesn’t need to be amazing. It polishes forgotten pop songs, uncovers hidden origins, and reveals fans’ often endearing love for their idols.

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On Monday, English singer-songwriter Joanne Armatrading graciously recounted how she faced it last long In the 1980s, New York inspired her to write Rosie, that timeless hit with its bronzed voice driving the beat of reggae. It allowed the almost forgotten French singer Patrick Hernandez to be widely remembered as his European disco hit Born to survive, which made him very wealthy in the late 1970s. And Volendammer Jeroen Tuijp, a fan of Nick Cave, spoke about his encounters with the Australian singer in Verona.

Tuijp traveled with his wife specifically to the Cave concert in the Italian town square. The day after the party they had lunch on the terrace of Lake Garda. Guess who walked towards them there. A second meeting followed shortly afterwards, Cave and his guitarist lying on sunbeds beside those of Tuijp and his wife. Dutch took care of his cave towel while he went swimming: the task that Tuijp gladly carried out for a group photo was: ‘Save it with your life’: tangible, eternal, happy evidence. What a wonderfully pointless story Summit 2000 He has a patent.

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