The apple is not only good for thirst, but also for new brain cells

The apple is not only good for thirst, but also for new brain cells

An apple a day keeps the doctor awayThe British say. Fruit maintains your health in countless ways; It is a source of energy, vitamins, and many other substances that help the body and mind function. The apple now gets an extra star, because it appears to stimulate the production of new brain cells. A team of German researchers demonstrated this in a professional journal Stem Cell Reports. The team was led by Gerd Kemberman, a member of the University of Dresden and responsible for neurogenesis.

Neurogenesis, the production of new brain cells, remains a kind of scientific puzzle. It has long been believed that an adult brain is incapable of forming neurons. In an enlarged brain, only neurons die, with all the cognitive decline that ensues. But gradually more and more indications to the contrary emerged. Laboratory experiments and animal research have proven that adult brains can also produce new nerve cells.

Ductility

Perhaps the same is the case with humans. The effect is minimal and therefore difficult to prove, but it is important for brain flexibility, for learning performance, memory and ability to adapt to new conditions.

Today, the development of the human brain is affected by many factors. Because of his behavior (rest, stress, drinking), his environment and his diet. Thus, there will be many factors that can affect neurogenesis. But to find out the mechanism, Kimberman and his colleagues focused entirely on apples, and just a few of the many beneficial compounds they contain.

Two substances were found to promote the formation of new neurons in the test tube and in the brains of live mice. These substances (quercetin and benzoic acid) are not very specific to apples, they are also found in other types of fruits; They have been on the human list since they walked Earth and can be found in supplement trade today.

But its stimulating effect on neurogenesis has now been demonstrated with apples. To be precise: with the peel and pulp of an apple. Researchers also tested apple juice, but it had no effect. The concentrations in the juice are likely to be very low.

Also read:

The adult brain makes new nerve cells.

But where and why?

READ  Dutch Organization for Scientific Research, The Hague / Vilamedia

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