An Australian model in America? These are Joe Biden’s new rules for asylum and protection in America

Biden’s new and proposed rules and procedures are somewhat reminiscent of the way Europe grapples with asylum and migration and at the same time Australia’s assertive approach.

The latter country makes a sharp distinction between legal and illegal, good and bad asylum seekers. Bona fide asylum seekers are those who submit an application from their home country or a third country and receive prior permission to come to Australia (by air). The worst are those who go to the Australian coast by boat: they are unduly denied.

For decades, Australia has had agreements with Pacific countries such as Nauru where discarded boat people are sent. They have to stay in detention centers and go through their asylum procedures there – even if it’s clear from the start that they won’t be allowed into Australia. A third group, situated somewhere between the good and the bad, arrive by plane without prior arrangement: those people are actually allowed to submit an application, although it is usually refused.

What Biden is now imposing on immigrants/asylum seekers from Nicaragua, Venezuela, Cuba and Haiti is similar to Australian policy: boat people have no chance anyway, and only those who start the process from outside the US are still eligible.

A new regulation in effect in the United States All Asylum seekers (who must first submit an application in Mexico if traveling to the U.S. via Mexico) are reminded of European rules and treaties. This is the basic idea behind the EU-Turkey agreement (Turkey is a ‘safe third country’) and the Dublin rules within the EU (the first country of origin in the EU is the only country that can claim asylum).

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