Watch the glow-in-the-dark world at sea during a nighttime fluorine diving session |  National Geographic

Watch the glow-in-the-dark world at sea during a nighttime fluorine diving session | National Geographic

In bioluminescence, blue light falls on an animal, which is then reflected in a different color, often bright shades of green, orange, or red. This differs from bioluminescence, where animals such as jellyfish or fireflies create their light through a chemical reaction.

(Watch the beautiful glowing sea creatures.)

The sea makes this phenomenon more complicated. Humans can perceive red, green, and blue, but it’s different underwater. The deeper we go into the water, the light becomes of certain wavelengths from the visible spectrum Graduation. At a depth of about six meters we no longer see red. After about thirty meters, almost everything is blue or green, until you reach shower area It reaches where the light does not penetrate, at a depth of about a thousand meters.

Many marine organisms that live at great depths have eyes with a yellow filter, which allows them to observe bioluminescence in other fish. However, humans need special equipment like yellow filter masks and ultraviolet diving lights to see these creatures glow in all their colors underwater.

Watch this hidden world

Fluorine diving may seem like an exotic expedition, but it’s increasingly being offered at dive centers around the world, says Eric Albinson of International Diving Organization.Professional Association of Diving Instructors(PADI). According to him, it could be anywhere where there are “tropical seas and proper corals.” Unlike bioluminescence, which occurs mainly in summer, travelers can observe bioluminescence all year round.

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