No, Vaccines Don't Magnet Your Arm - Science

No, Vaccines Don’t Magnet Your Arm – Science

Contrary to what is claimed on social networks, vaccines against COVID-19 do not magnetize a vaccinated person’s arm. A study by the University of Namur has shown this. However, there is a “sticking phenomenon” where certain substances can stick to the skin, but according to the researchers, it may be associated with a localized inflammatory reaction with the secretion of water and fat.

Videos and photos are circulating on social media of people who, after vaccination, were able to get things, such as keys, cutlery or their smartphone, to stick to the injection site. A case study led by Professor Jean-Michel Dony from UNamur examined whether this could be related to magnetism, as claimed in these videos.

The results are clear: measurements using various devices that detect magnetic fields show the absence of magnetism. In addition, materials that are not affected by magnetism, such as aluminum, stick to the arm. The researchers found that the “stickiness phenomenon” did not occur in the arm where the vaccine had not been administered.

One hypothesis is that vaccination may cause a localized inflammatory response that may lead to increased water and possibly sebum secretion in some individuals. These substances can cause contact adhesion of some materials. Moreover, the effect of the adhesive can be reversed by applying magnesium sulfate.

Videos and photos are circulating on social media of people who, after vaccination, were able to get things, such as keys, cutlery or their smartphone, to stick to the injection site. A case study led by Professor Jean-Michel Dony from UNamur examined whether this could be related to magnetism, as claimed in these videos. The results are clear: measurements using various devices that detect magnetic fields show the absence of magnetism. In addition, materials that are not affected by magnetism, such as aluminum, stick to the arm. The researchers found that the “stickiness phenomenon” did not occur in the arm where the vaccine had not been administered. One hypothesis is that vaccination may cause a localized inflammatory response that may lead to increased water and possibly sebum secretion in some individuals. These substances can cause contact adhesion of some materials. Moreover, the adhesive effect can be undone by applying magnesium sulfate.

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