History has its importance in the role of education and education in the influence of the colonial past

History has its importance in the role of education and education in the influence of the colonial past

What role does education and education play in the impact of the past of colonialism and slavery? In a new episode of History Matters, Hasna El Maroudi talks about this with Cecily Dos Santos, Zadkine’s educational work teacher and branch director at Humankind Childcare and Development, history teacher Eline Rademakers and Breana Bute, law student and guest editor at History Matters.

History teacher Elaine Rademaker has developed an educational package to create polyphony in the curriculum. With this, it hopes to penetrate the “cultural archive”. “The cultural archive is all the ideas that actually exist, in this case about the colonial past,” explains Rademakers. “I am a high school history teacher and do my Ph.D. at university. What I noticed was that I was divided. The science was at a certain level, but the education was a little late. For example, when thinking about the use of words. You talk in science about “slaves.” Whereas in my textbooks it says “slaves”.

Student and guest editor Breana Bute understands the difference the Rademakers are talking about. “In high school we had one chapter on the golden age and one paragraph on slavery. The implications of this were not actually discussed.”

Next week, in the second part of this episode, Hasna Al-Maroudi talks to her Alderman Fawzi Ashber, from Well-being, Society, Sports and Digital Inclusion, and Katja Antunes, Professor of the History of Global Economic Networks at Leiden University. All episodes of “History Matters” over here It can be found on the Shared Past, Joint Future Rotterdam website.

See also  Suriname erkent slechte omgang met cultuur en erfgoed, wil wet aanpassen

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.