From next spring by boat from Groningen to Norway

From next spring by boat from Groningen to Norway

Two weeks ago the newly built cruise ship Aidacosma entered Eemshaven.Beeld Lars Klemmer / TNN / dpa

Dutch-Norwegian shipping company Lines announced on Monday that crossing over the North Sea takes more than fourteen hours. The ferry departs from Emshavn on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays to dock in Kristians and the next day around 9am. A return ticket costs at least 225 euros. Ticket sales begin this week, and transit is scheduled to begin in April.

A study showed that traveling by boat is more than two and a half times less harmful to the environment than flying published by the European Environment Agency last spring. According to the agency, it costs the equivalent of 61 grams of carbon dioxide emissions on average to transport a passenger one kilometer per ferry. With a plane weighing 160 grams. Train travel is more environmentally friendly at 33 grams per passenger per kilometer.

Hook Van Holland

At the moment, ferries only depart from the Netherlands to the UK and Germany. Ferries depart from Hoek van Holland, Rotterdam and IJmuiden to the cities of Harwich, Hull and Newcastle respectively on the British East Coast. The ferry sails from Eemshaven to the German Wadden Island Borkum, a crossing of less than an hour, comparable to ferry services to the Dutch Wadden Islands.

The new ferry service is a collaboration between, among others, the sea port of Groningen, the county of Groningen and the municipality of Het Hoagland. In addition to tourism, the “modern cruise ferry”, as Holland Norway Lines describes the ship ferry MS Romantika, is also intended for freight traffic. Caravans and caravans as well as trucks can be transported on the ferry. The company promises its passengers a “diverse offer” of food, duty-free shopping and in-flight entertainment.

roseth

Incidentally, this is not the first time that Eemshaven appears to have a ferry service at a greater distance. In 2019, a Scottish company wanted to set up a ferry service between Rosyth, a port near Edinburgh, and the largest seaport in the north of the Netherlands. However, these plans have been repeatedly delayed, presumably due to disagreements within the company.

Last summer, Seaport manager Cass Koenig, who was also involved in ferry plans at the time, said against it Al Shamal newspaper He assumed that plans for a ferry service to Rosyth had been postponed. At that point, Koenig hadn’t heard of the Scots in months. König has not given up on other ferry services yet: “Emshavn remains a convenient port for many ferry services.”

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