Climate impact will deeply transform the maps of global agriculture and be faster than expected

Climate impact will deeply transform the maps of global agriculture and be faster than expected

Maize harvest in Kenya. NASA’s new large-scale study shows that, among other things, climate change will shrink areas such as Central America, Central and East Asia and West Africa by almost a quarter in the coming years.

Rising temperatures, low rainfall and high heat waves and droughts will severely affect global agricultural yields over the next ten years. This is clear from the new large-scale study by NASA and others.

It has long been clear that climate change is having a major impact on agriculture. However, the impact of global food distribution will be felt sooner than previously thought. In addition, the new step will significantly increase existing imbalances Study It was released on Leading Natural Food.

“We see new climatic conditions pushing crop yields in greater areas beyond their normal range,” explains NASA scientist and lead author of the study. Jonas Jaggermeyer From. The meteorologist and his team created new unprecedented climate models using new technology.

Corn and wheat

They concluded that areas such as Central America, Central and East Asia and West Africa would see corn yields fall by almost a quarter in the coming years. At the same time, wheat yields in areas such as North America and China will increase by about 17 percent.

“One effect of the data clearly shows that poor countries are likely to experience a sharp decline in the yields of their major crops.”

Man-made greenhouse gas emissions include high temperatures, changes in rainfall patterns, and high carbon dioxide (CO2, Red.) In the air. It affects the growth of crops. Within the next decade or so, we see extraordinary years turning into regular routines in many major bread baskets and granary areas around the world, ”said Jackermeyer.

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Researchers emphasize that high wheat yields in some areas do not compensate for lean maize crops in the southern world. In addition, they indicate high CO though2Concentrations promote the growth of certain grains, which can have a negative effect on their nutritional value.

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© Birom Seck / ICRC

Food inequality

“One effect that the data clearly shows is that poorer countries may experience a strong decline in the yields of their major crops,” explains co-author Christoph Mல்லller. ‘This will magnify the existing differences in food security and prosperity,’ says a scientist at the Bodstam Institute for Climate Impact Research.

Researchers point out that farmers need to adapt to new conditions in the short term by sowing at different times or using different crops. But the new models clearly show that farmers in northern latitudes face less difficulties than their counterparts in areas around the equator.

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