A unique exhibition that translates science into images, music and dance

A unique exhibition that translates science into images, music and dance

June 13, 2024

What happens when Leiden scholars from different fields, looking at complex social problems together, unite with artists? The results were presented on Tuesday, June 11, during a unique exhibition. Watch and discover.

How can you reach a wider audience with your research? For example, by replacing classical methods, such as laboratory research or publishing articles, with musical compositions, photo essays and visual projections. That’s why the Young Academy Leiden (YAL, a partnership between doctoral students within Leiden University) and JUL (Young University Leiden, a network for young employees who want to get more out of their work and time at Leiden University) have joined forces with artists in A. The result can be seen today during the exhibition.

Music and meditation

“It is a unique event,” says organizer Jan van Rijn as he opens the meeting to a full room in the Lipsius building. You can see this exhibition as a new form of science communication. All researchers give a brief explanation of their project, where the audience will watch a small musical performance by musician Vincent Martigues and student Lynthe van Rooij will restore peace through a meditation exercise. After that, visitors get the chance to wander around on their own. Visitors’ senses are stimulated in a new way for over two hours. take a look:

Text and photo: Wilke Gerdes

About the exhibition

This exhibition was the final activity of YAL’s “Interdisciplinary Seasons” series, in which researchers from different disciplines work together to solve complex issues. The exhibition was created in collaboration with LIACS Media Technology and ReCNTR and showcased a total of seven projects that pushed the boundaries between art and science. The exhibition was a one-off visit, but organizers Jan van Rijn and Bram Buchen Hospers are excited about the result. As far as they’re concerned, there will be a sequel next year so they can continue bridging the gap between art and science.

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