A new study finds that mushrooms communicate with each other using a lexicon of up to 50 words |  Science

A new study finds that mushrooms communicate with each other using a lexicon of up to 50 words | Science

Mushrooms and fungi may seem like little words, but they are actually true means of communication. At least that should be evident from the research of a computer scientist. In the Professional Journal Royal Society Open Science The researcher writes that the average lexicon for various fungi is at least 50 words.

Previous research has already shown that fungi can indeed communicate with each other. They will do this using underground wire-like connections – threads – and electrical impulses. This is similar to the way neurons process information in the human body.

eavesdropper

The new study looked at four types of fungi: caterpillar fungus, canine fungus, velvet foot fungus, and ghost fungus. This last fungus did not steal its name and is so named because of its bioluminescent properties: it glows in the dark.

ghost template © KameraOne

Computer scientist Andrew Adamatsky (University of the West of England) obtained tiny electrodes that he attached to the fungi hyphae. While the fungi were communicating with each other, Adamatsky tried to eavesdrop.

Each peak of fungal activity was linguistically analyzed. What turned out? Each peak or pulse varies in duration and length, allowing a different meaning to be associated with it. At the end, for example, there will be a lexicon of up to 50 different words, of which 15-20 are often used.

Why do fungi communicate with each other?

Perhaps the fungi communicate for the same reason wolves howl: simply to let each other know they’re there. In addition, they may also be able to send signals for new food sources to each other. “Or say nothing at all,” Adamatsky suggests. Then the recorded pulses will be no more than a measured potential difference.

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quotes

Before we add the fungus language to Google Translate, more research is required.

Dan Pepper, a biologist who was not involved in the study

Cash

Therefore, other researchers not involved in the study are skeptical. “The research reveals rhythmic patterns in electrical signals. These patterns are similar to the feeding legumes seen in other fungi,” said Dan Pepper, Senior Lecturer in Biological Sciences at the University of Exeter. As a language he seems overly enthusiastic. Before we add the fungus language to Google Translate, more research is needed.”

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